Andrássy, Gyula, Count
(1823–1890)
   Hungarian prime minister and Habsburg foreign minister. Andrássy was born March 1823 in Kassa to a distinguished Magyar family, became a member of parliament in 1847, and joined the Hungarian independence movement led by Lajos Kossuth. He served as a commander with the Hungarian troops in the war of independence in 1848–49. As a consequence of the Hungarian defeat he was forced to flee the country but was permitted to return in 1857. He became one the preeminent Hungarian politicians that negotiated the Ausgleich of 1867, which settled Hungary’s semiautonomous position within the Habsburg Empire. Andrássy was the leader of the liberals and prime minister of Hungary from 1867 to 1871, when he was appointed foreign minister of the Habsburg monarchy, a position he held until 1879. His “Andrássy Note” of December 1875 influenced the Congress of Berlin in 1878. He pushed for the occupation of Bosnia-Herzegovina in the aftermath of the Russo-Turkish War. Just before he resigned in October 1879, Andrássy signed the Dual Alliance treaty with Germany. He died in February 1890 in Istria.
   See also <>; <>; <>; <>; <>.
   FURTHER READING:
    Bagdasarian, Nicholas Der. The Austro-German Rapprochement, 1870-1879. Rutherford, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1976;
    Harris, David. A Diplomatic History of the Balkan Crisis, 1875-1878. Hamden, CT: Archon Books, 1969.
   GUENTHER KRONENBITTER

Encyclopedia of the Age of Imperialism, 1800–1914. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Andrássy Gyula, Count — born March 3, 1823, Kassa, Hung., Austrian Empire died Feb. 18, 1890, Volosco, Istria, Austria Hungary Hungarian politician. A follower of Kossuth Lajos, Andrássy helped lead the unsuccessful revolt of 1848–49, then fled into exile until 1857. He …   Universalium

  • Andrássy, Gyula, Count (Gróf) — ▪ prime minister of Hungary German in full  Julius, Graf (Count) Andrássy von Csikszentkirály und Krasznahorka  born March 3, 1823, Kassa, Hung., Austrian Empire [now Košice, Slovakia] died Feb. 18, 1890, Volosco, Istria, Austria Hungary [now in… …   Universalium

  • Andrássy Gyula German Language University of Budapest — Infobox University name = Andrássy Gyula Deutschsprachige Universität Budapest native name = Andrássy Gyula Budapesti Német Nyelvű Egyetem latin name = motto = established = 2002 type = University endowment = Open Foundation for the German… …   Wikipedia

  • count — count1 /kownt/, v.t. 1. to check over (the separate units or groups of a collection) one by one to determine the total number; add up; enumerate: He counted his tickets and found he had ten. 2. to reckon up; calculate; compute. 3. to list or name …   Universalium

  • Andrássy — is the name of an aristocratic family of very ancient lineage prominent in Hungarian history. The present head of the family is Count Gyula Andrássy de Csik Szent Király Kraszna Horka (b.1927), who with his family currently resides in Canada. He… …   Wikipedia

  • Gyula Andrássy the Younger — Count Gyula Andrássy de Csíkszentkirály et Krasznahorka the Younger ( hu. Ifj. Andrássy Gyula ) (30 June 1860 11 June 1929) was a Hungarian politician.The second son of Count Gyula Andrássy, the younger Andrássy became under secretary in the… …   Wikipedia

  • Gyula Károlyi — Count Gyula Károlyi de Nagykároly Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Hungary In office 24 August 1931 – 1 October 1932 ( 100000000000000010000001 year, 1000000000000003800000038 …   Wikipedia

  • Gyula Andrássy — For the article on Gyula Andrássy son, see Gyula Andrássy the Younger. The native form of this personal name is csíkszentkirályi és krasznahorkai gróf Andrássy Gyula. This article uses the Western name order. Gyula Andrássy …   Wikipedia

  • Gyula Szapáry — The native form of this personal name is szapári, muraszombati és széchy szigeti gróf Szapáry Gyula. This article uses the Western name order. Gyula Szapáry Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Hungary …   Wikipedia

  • Andrássy — biographical name Gyula, count; father 1823 1890 & son 1860 1929 Hungarian statesmen …   New Collegiate Dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”