French Equatorial Africa


French Equatorial Africa
   French Equatorial Africa (Afrique équatoriale française) was a federation of French colonies, stretching northward from the Congo River into the Sahara Desert. From 1880 to 1910, the French expanded their colonial empire into West and Central Africa. The federation was formed in 1910, as an administrative grouping modeled after the Afrique Occidentale Francaise, French West Africa, which was formed in 1895. Savorgna de Brazza, the French Commissioner for the French Congo, was largely responsible for its creation. The new federation consisted of Middle Congo, Gabon, and Ubangi-Shari-Chad. In 1920, however, Chad left the federation and was ruled as a separate colony. After the Agadir Crisis in 1911, part of French Equatorial Africa was ceded to German Cameroon. This part was later returned to France according to the terms in the Treaty of Versailles signed in 1919. The federation’s capital and seat of the governor-general was Brazzaville. With only 3 million inhabitants spread over 965,000 square miles, the federation was sparsely populated and not an attractive target for investment.
   See also <>; <>, <>.
   FURTHER READING:
    Aldrich, Robert. Greater France: A History of French Overseas Expansion. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1996;
    Manning, Patrick. Francophone Sub-Saharan Africa 1880-1995. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998;
    Wesseling, H. L. The European Colonial Empires 1815-1919. New York: Longman, 2004.
   NURFADZILAH YAHAYA

Encyclopedia of the Age of Imperialism, 1800–1914. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • French Equatorial Africa — former federation of French colonies in central Africa …   English World dictionary

  • French Equatorial Africa — Infobox Former Country native name= Afrique équatoriale française conventional long name= French Equatorial Africa common name= French Equatorial Africa continent= Africa status= Federation status text= Federation of French colonies empire=… …   Wikipedia

  • French Equatorial Africa — a former federation of French territories in central Africa, including Chad, Gabon, Middle Congo (now People s Republic of the Congo), and Ubangi Shari (now Central African Republic): each became independent in 1960. * * * formerly French Congo… …   Universalium

  • French Equatorial Africa — French′ Equato′rial Af′rica n. geg a former federation of French territories in central Africa, including Chad, Gabon, Middle Congo (now People s Republic of the Congo), and Ubangi Shari (now Central African Republic): each became independent in… …   From formal English to slang

  • French Equatorial Africa — or earlier French Congo geographical name former country W central Africa N of Congo River comprising a federation of Chad, Gabon, Middle Congo, & Ubangi Shari territories capital Brazzaville …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • French Equatorial Africa — noun a former federation of French territories, in central Africa: Chad, Gabon, Middle Congo, and Ubangi Shari …   Australian English dictionary

  • French Equatorial Africa — a former federation of French territories in central Africa, including Chad, Gabon, Middle Congo (now People s Republic of the Congo), and Ubangi Shari (now Central African Republic): each became independent in 1960 …   Useful english dictionary

  • French Equatorial Africa — noun A federation in central Africa, stretching from the Sahara to the Congo River …   Wiktionary

  • French Equatorial Africa — former colonies Benin or Dahomey, Cameroon, the Central African Empire, the French Congo, Gabon, and Guinea …   Eponyms, nicknames, and geographical games

  • List of colonial heads of French Equatorial Africa — (Dates in italics indicate de facto continuation of office) Term Incumbent Notes French Equatorial Africa protectorate     (Afrique Equatoriale Français (AEF)) 1883 to 28 September 1897[1] Pierre Savorgnan de Brazza,… …   Wikipedia

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