Dalhousie, George Ramsay, Ninth Earl of Dalhousie
(1770–1838)
   Governor-general of Canada from 1891 to 1828, Dalhousie served extensively in the Napoleonic wars, rising to the rank of lieutenant-general during the Peninsular campaign. In 1816, he was appointed lieutenant-governor of Nova Scotia, where his support for nonsectarian education led to the founding of the university that now bears his name, on the model of the University of Edinburgh. Appointed governorgeneral of Canada in 1819, he fell into quarrels with French-Canadian politicians about the prerogatives of the executive and control of finances. His aggressive intervention in a local election led Colonial Secretary William Huskisson to transfer Dalhousie to India, where he served as commander-in-chief of the army.
   FURTHER READING:
    McInnis, E. W. Canada A Political and Social History. Toronto: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1970.
   MARK F. PROUDMAN

Encyclopedia of the Age of Imperialism, 1800–1914. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Dalhousie, George Ramsay, ninth Earl of — (1770 1838)    A Scottish peer. Entered the army at an early age and saw service in various parts of the world. From 1812 to 1814 commanded the 7th division of the British army in France and Spain. Received the thanks of Parliament for his… …   The makers of Canada

  • Dalhousie College —    Located at Halifax. Founded by George Ramsay, ninth Earl of Dalhousie, 1818. Original endowment derived from funds collected at the port of Castine, Maine, during its occupation, 1814, by Sir John Sherbrooke, then lieutenant governor of Nova… …   The makers of Canada

  • University of Edinburgh — Coordinates: 55°56′50.6″N 3°11′13.9″W / 55.947389°N 3.187194°W / 55.947389; 3.187194 …   Wikipedia

  • India — /in dee euh/, n. 1. Hindi, Bharat. a republic in S Asia: a union comprising 25 states and 7 union territories; formerly a British colony; gained independence Aug. 15, 1947; became a republic within the Commonwealth of Nations Jan. 26, 1950.… …   Universalium

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